David O. Selznick pops up some imitation Capra-corn
  • There’s Always Vanilla (1971)

    George A. Romero gave birth to the modern zombie film with the 1968 release of Night of the Living Dead, which he followed up with Dawn of the Dead in 1978. That’s a big gap, and one in which Mr. Romero was not idle.  Now, thanks to Arrow Video,...
  • Oscar (1967)

    Rich industrialist Bertrand Barnier (Louis de Funès) is about to have a bad day.  First, he is awakened at an early hour by an employee, Christian Martin (Claude Rich), who both requests a 100% raise and admits to having embezzled 60 million francs from the company.  Still, Bertrand can’t arrest...
  • Wide Open (1930)

    Film critic Nathan Rabin coined the term “Manic Pixie Dream Girl” to refer to an entire class of imaginary female characters designed by screen writers to bring timid or brooding male characters out of their shells or their particular funk.  The term was used specifically in reference to Kirsten...
  • The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971)

    The classic Universal creature features of the 1930s and 40s served as my entry point into horror cinema.  Filmed in black and white, the films oozed atmosphere, but they never featured anything truly terrifying that my six year-old self couldn’t handle.  The monsters were slow-witted and lumbering, but even...
  • Kill, Baby… Kill! (Operazione paura,1966)

    In my last review, we took a look at Sergio Martino’s The Suspicious Death of a Minor (1975), a solid “mash-up” of two Italian film genres, “giallo” and “poliziotteschi.” Today we’re going to take a look at a standout in Italian gothic horror, written and directed by one of its...
  • Take a Good Look (1959-1961)

    It’s only October, but I can already name the best video release of the year.  That honor goes to Shout! Factory’s Ernie Kovacs: Take A Good Look: The Definitive Collection, which contains every surviving episode of a short-lived game show hosted by avant-garde television comedian Ernie Kovacs. Kovacs has...
  • Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story (2015)

    If you’re a fan of documentaries or of movies in general, you won’t want to miss Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story.  This delightful film documents the ups and downs in the careers and marriage of two of the unsung heroes of American cinema, Harold and Lillian Michelson....
  • Summer Night (Notte d’estate con profilo greco, occhi a mandorla e odore di basilico, 1986)

    When an artist makes a masterpiece, it can be difficult to accept a work from that same artist that is merely good, well made, or fun.  Lina Wertmüller encountered this type of prejudice towards the films she wrote and directed in the late Seventies and beyond.  No matter how good...
  • The Suspicious Death of a Minor (Morte sospetta di una minorenne, 1975)

    To understand and appreciate Sergio Martino’s The Suspicious Death of a Minor, a.k.a. Too Young to Die, a little history of Italian film, specifically the genre known as “giallo“ and the subgenre “poliziotteschi,” is needed. Giallo was a 20th Century Italian film genre that was part mystery, part slasher film,...
  • A Fish Called Wanda (1988)

    A Fish Called Wanda is a more popular, better-known title than I usually review in the Bottom Shelf, but for much of the general public, films more than 20 years old are not even on their radar.  Consequently, I felt that Arrow Video’s 4K restoration and Blu-ray release would...
  • Children of the Corn (1984)

    The 1980s were banner years for the horror genre. Jason Vorhees was slaying counselors at Camp Crystal Lake, a.k.a. Camp BLOOD, in the Friday the 13th series. Freddy Krueger helped many teenagers to their permanent rest in the Nightmare on Elm Street franchise. Michael Myers, though he started in the late...
  • The Love God? (1969)

    The late Sixties was a time when cinema pushed the boundaries of what was considered acceptable film fare.  Movies such as Bonnie and Clyde (1967) and The Wild Bunch (1969) went further than ever before in depicting screen violence.  Titles such as The Pawnbroker (1964), Blow-up (1966), and Midnight Cowboy (1969) broke...
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IT CAME FROM THE BOTTOM SHELF! is a movie recommendation site, focusing on forgotten classics, lesser-known gems, and oddball discoveries.

William T. Garver (a.k.a. garv), formerly of boozemovies.com, is the one-man band behind It Came From the Bottom Shelf!

Email: garv@bottomshelfmovies.com
Facebook: @ItCameFromTheBottomShelf
Twitter: @BttmShlfMovies

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  • While William Randolph Hearst always wanted to promote his mistress/live-in companion, Marion Davies, as an virtuous, innocent beauty, Marion bristled against playing the delicate flower.  Davies had a flair...
  • There have been literally dozens of film and television adaptations of Alexandre Dumas’ novel Les Trois Mousquetaires; but once you’ve seen director Richard Lester’s one-two punch of The Three Musketeers...
  • Film critic Nathan Rabin coined the term “Manic Pixie Dream Girl” to refer to an entire class of imaginary female characters designed by screen writers to bring timid or...
  • There are some movies, which are like the denizens on the “Island of Misfit Toys” — just a little bit off, a tad strange, a smidge odd, or altogether...