Why are the good people dying?
  • A Fish Called Wanda (1988)

    A Fish Called Wanda is a more popular, better-known title than I usually review in the Bottom Shelf, but for much of the general public, films more than 20 years old are not even on their radar.  Consequently, I felt that Arrow Video’s 4K restoration and Blu-ray release would...
  • Children of the Corn (1984)

    The 1980s were banner years for the horror genre. Jason Vorhees was slaying counselors at Camp Crystal Lake, a.k.a. Camp BLOOD, in the Friday the 13th series. Freddy Krueger helped many teenagers to their permanent rest in the Nightmare on Elm Street franchise. Michael Myers, though he started in the late...
  • The Love God? (1969)

    The late Sixties was a time when cinema pushed the boundaries of what was considered acceptable film fare.  Movies such as Bonnie and Clyde (1967) and The Wild Bunch (1969) went further than ever before in depicting screen violence.  Titles such as The Pawnbroker (1964), Blow-up (1966), and Midnight Cowboy (1969) broke...
  • Seven Beauties (Pasqualino Settebellezze, 1975)

    The movies are an entertainment medium, but they are also an art form.  Consequently, there is a huge variance in quality, even amongst well-made films.  There are good films.  There are great films.  There are four-star films.  Then, there are those very rare films that transcend the medium and...
  • Bram Stoker’s Dracula (TV Movie, 1973)

    Dracula — Ever since Bram Stoker wrote the novel in 1897, we have been fascinated with vampires, and none more so than Vlad Tepes, a.k.a Vlad The Impaler, a.k.a. Dracula. Twenty-two actors (and counting) have portrayed the undead “Prince of Darkness” on film, including: Bela Lugosi — Dracula Prime...
  • Don’t Torture a Duckling (Non si sevizia un paperino, 1972)

    Don’t Torture a Duckling is a grubby, nasty, unpleasant little thriller… and I look forward to watching it again.  While technically a giallo, it is one of the most unusual films in the genre, as it avoids many of the calling cards of gialli — black gloves, knives, an...
  • The Ice Pirates (1984)

    Welcome back, gentle viewers, to another “Junk Drawer” review.  In our first two reviews we delved into the world of Spanish horror with the Scream Factory Double Feature which included The Night of the Sorcerers and The Loreley’s Grasp. Today, we’re going to tackle the 1984 sci-fi parody, The Ice...
  • The Loreley’s Grasp (Los garras de Lorelei, 1974)

    Welcome back! As promised, here is the review to The Loreley’s Grasp, the second film in the Scream Factory Blu-ray Double Feature that includes The Night of the Sorcerers.  Also released in 1974, The Loreley’s Grasp is one part monster movie and one part Wagnerian opera. Mix together for goofiness. A small...
  • Erik the Conqueror (Gli invasori, 1961)

    On the whole, I’m not a fan of sword and shield pictures.  I find the clashing of metal against metal to be fairly tiresome, I have trouble following the rather arbitrary distribution of royal titles, and a flaming arrow leaves me cold.  Yet, I loved Erik the Conqueror (1961)....
  • The Night of the Sorcerers (La noche de los brujos, 1974)

    There are some movies, which are like the denizens on the “Island of Misfit Toys” — just a little bit off, a tad strange, a smidge odd, or altogether broken. Still, just because these misfits find themselves in the junk drawer of cinema history, doesn’t mean that they don’t...
  • Beggars of Life (1928)

    In 1927, The Jazz Singer took the nation by storm with a new cinema novelty — sound.  Looking back, it’s a shame that sound hit when it did, because motion pictures had just reached a zenith in visual storytelling.  Directors such as F.W. Murnau, Abel Gance, and William Wellman...
  • Swept Away (Travolti da un insolito destino nell’azzurro mare d’agosto, 1974)

    Forget Christian Grey and his fifty shades, if you want to watch a sadomasochistic love story that really cooks, look no further than Lina Wertmüller’s Swept Away (1974, not to be confused with the 2002 remake of the same name).  Not only is the film better written, better acted,...
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IT CAME FROM THE BOTTOM SHELF! is a movie recommendation site, focusing on forgotten classics, lesser-known gems, and oddball discoveries.

William T. Garver (a.k.a. garv), formerly of boozemovies.com, is the one-man band behind It Came From the Bottom Shelf!

Email: garv@bottomshelfmovies.com
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Twitter: @BttmShlfMovies

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  • While William Randolph Hearst always wanted to promote his mistress/live-in companion, Marion Davies, as an virtuous, innocent beauty, Marion bristled against playing the delicate flower.  Davies had a flair...
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